A lifestyle magazine focused on finding balance between adventure and everyday life.


The existential travel blog limb of a multimedia interview project, also featuring a podcast. 


December 21, 2016▶▶ RESPITE: THE HARMONEY MOTEL (promotional post)

December 12, 2016▶▶ SAN DIEGO: WHERE LIFE IS EASY

December 6, 2016▶▶ LOS ANGELES: CAN YOU SEE YOURSELF?

November 30, 2016 ▶▶ SAN FRANCISCO: ARTS, CULTURE, & STRUGGLE

November 22, 2016 ▶▶ YOGA, VEGANISM, & HIGHWAY 101

November 17, 2016 ▶▶ PORTLANDIA: RETRACING MY STEPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

A high-end print magazine focused on the community of Missoula, MT.  


A CENTURY OF BUSINESS IN MISSOULA ◀◀  July 22, 2016

TEAM RED, WHITE, AND BLUE ◀◀  October 21, 2016

 

 

 

A website dedicated to learning and appreciating the art of dancing salsa.


Recent from Beyond Words:

APRIL 10, 2017 ▶▶  LIVING THE CARIBBEAN LIFE IN CARTAGENA DE INDIAS

If you’ve always wanted to make it to the Caribbean, it’s time to add Cartagena de Indias to your travel list. It’s a golden, windswept city, known for its extreme heat, colonial architecture, and the ancient stone wall that runs along its Caribbean shoreline. Based on meeting the ranking criteria for “outstanding universal value,” it’s also a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its history as an important stop on the trade passage through the West Indies, as well as the being the vertex of the power struggle over the new world.

Khakis and White Socks With Sandals: Tourism and the Old City

When I decided to plan a trip to Colombia’s northern coast this winter from my new home base in Medellín, I was honestly a little torn about whether or not I should make a stop in Cartagena. I’d heard different reports, but a lot them were from backpackers and digital nomads, all of whom seemed nonplussed by the experience. “Think khakis and white socks with sandals,” one German guy told me, by way of a warning. “I’d say spend a day or two there, then head to Santa Marta.” Other negative reports included mentions of oppressive heat, pushy salespeople, “sketchiness,” and lackluster beaches.

But another friend told me, “It’s worth going, just once.” So I went.

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Recent from the Millennial Search for Meaning blog:

January 2, 2017 ▶▶ ALONE IN JOSHUA TREE

“Anything I should make sure to do while I’m up there?” I asked the ranger at the Joshua Tree Visitor’s Center.

“Yeah,” he replied, leaning forward in a stern posture. “You need to make sure you hang a flashlight in your tent, turn it on, then take about thirty steps back, snap a photo, and post it on social media.” He tossed me a wink, handed me a map, and added, “Have fun!”

I was exhausted, which, I know, I mention in pretty much every post -- but this time, I’d stayed up most of the night finishing"Parentification," the latest podcast episode. I'd spent the morning attempting to jolt myself awake with 16 ounces of opaque coffee while catching up on emails at a yuppified hangout close to the road leading up to the park. Now, I hopped in the car, turned my phone on airplane mode and started winding my way through the low-lying rock formations toward Joshua Tree National Park.

It was with reluctance that I’d departed from San Diego a few days before. San Diego is a soothing place -- I’d made friends in the relatively short time I spent there, and laughed and hung out with my longtime best friend. But after ten days and an overstayed welcome, it had seemed like time to leave. I drove through the dry dust of I-15, past windmills, red cliffs, billboards, and small towns. I pulled over to watch a train wind around the base of a bluff.

For the next few days, I laid low at the Harmony Motel, a historic motel in Twenty-Nine Palms, and took advantage of having a roof over my head to furiously catch up on the work on which I constantly seemed to be slipping behind. I took a break only to stop by the grocery store in Twenty-Nine palms and go on a quick run in the craggy rock formations on the outskirts.

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Recent from Missoula Valley Lifestyle Magazine:

November 11, 2016 ▶▶ FAITH IN ACTION: UNITING AGAINST HOMELESSNESS

 

 

Recent from Dance Papi: 

TANGO DANCE THERAPY: AN INTERVIEW WITH THERAPIST MARK WORD  ◀◀ April 5, 2016 

A few months ago, we posted an article about salsa, dance therapy, and PTSD. The post led us to connect with one of the readers who commented on the article, Mark Word. Mark is a therapist who worked for many years as a social work officer in the Army. Today, he continues his practice as a civilian working for the military, taking a special interest in those who suffer from PTSD.

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